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William Heisel's Antidote: Investigating Untold Health Stories

Doctors Behaving Badly: Dr. Gregory Burnham Camp

Think about what it takes to obtain a medical license. Some states' licensing boards will rubber stamp a license from another state but others, like California's, require a lot of hoops.

Then consider the case of Dr. Gregory Burnham Camp, who had licenses in California (No. 34329), Ohio (35-028433), North Carolina (36156) and Massachusetts. Why so many states?

When going nuclear, don't misunderestimate misadministration

Misadministration. When a physician has made a horrible mistake with wide-ranging ramifications, the terms "negligence," "malpractice" even "incompetence" might come to mind. Now this wonderful euphemism glides onto the scene, draping the wreckage in a filigree of blamelessness, warding off trial lawyers and investigative journalists.

Wrong doctor or wrong patient? Michael Jackson's physician has some explaining to do

Within hours of the news breaking about Michael Jackson's death, attention started to turn toward one of the only eyewitnesses to the event: his personal physician.

Q&A with New York Medicaid Inspector General Jim Sheehan: Watchdogging Nursing Homes

New York state has an interesting job that is foreign to
most other states, the office of the Medicaid Inspector General. Lucky for health writers, the Inspector General there, James G. Sheehan, believes not only in rooting out people who are ripping off taxpayers, but in sharing his techniques and tactics with reporters.

Salmonella At Yet Another Peanut Processor: FDA Warning Letters Tell the Story

Just when you thought it was safe to make that triple-decker peanut butter and banana sandwich, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has slapped another big peanut processor with a warning letter.

I wrote about the salmonella outbreak at a Peanut Corporation of America plant in March and offered some advice on how to investigate our national food safety system.

Contraindications: Dr. James Stirbl

Robin Lowe went to the Sano Medical Clinic in Costa Mesa one June with what appeared to be an obvious and urgent problem. She had felt a lump in her left breast.

At 29, she was young to develop breast cancer. Making matters worse, she was pregnant.

Dr. James Stirbl, the doctor who ran the clinic, examined Lowe but did not recommend she undergo a mammogram or a biopsy, according to the Medical Board of California.

The nuclear option: Bogdanich drops a bomb on VA hospital

Walt Bogdanich, three-time Pulitzer-winning New York Times reporter, has written a phenomenal story about cancer care at the Veterans Affairs hospital in Philadelphia and tapped into a rich source of material for medical writers: the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Q&A with Will Oremus: Why a high-flying doctor was worth pursuing

My fellow contributing editor here at ReportingonHealth, Barbara Feder Ostrov, suggested I might be beating up unnecessarily on Stanford neurosurgeon Dr. Doyle John Borchers III in my post Wednesday.

After all, the poor guy did crash his plane and die. Why go over his alleged drug history?

Here's why. One of my main goals in this blog is to explore all the different places you can find information for health stories.

Contraindications: Dr. Doyle John Borchers

When Stanford University neurosurgeon and amateur pilot Doyle John Borchers III (California License No. 64879) crashed his plane near Lake Tahoe last August, investigators wondered what the hell he was doing flying a plane at night in a mountainous area in the first place.

Borchers, who died in the crash, had been flying sporadically for less than a year and had only flown at night once before - the night before the crash.

Mark Katches: Now Heading Center for Investigative Reporting's California News Project

Devoted fans of Antidote no doubt read my interview with Mark Katches a few weeks ago. Katches was just named the editorial director for the Center for Investigative Reporting's new reporting project in California.

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Medicare recently announced big plans to tie half of all payments to performance by 2018. Is payment reform finally upon us, and could this help curb rising health care costs? Our expert panel will guide us through the changes and highlight innovations. For more info, click here.

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