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William Heisel's Antidote: Investigating Untold Health Stories

Doctors Behaving Badly: Stolen watch? Small time. Check out this five-finger discount!

Dr. Cleveland Enmon, the Stockton physician accused of stealing a retired police officer's watch as the officer was dying, may have learned by example.

Enmon went through his residency at the most infamous hospital on the West Coast: Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles. While there, he worked in the emergency room alongside Dr. Ahmed Rashed.

Use DIDA to dive deep into ghostwritten medical papers

Antidote promised in an earlier post to revisit the case of Dr. John Eden, who told Antidote he regretted working with a ghostwriter who had been paid by Wyeth to write an article about hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

Q&A with Thomas Sullivan: Part 2: Medical education companies don't deserve media abuse

Thomas Sullivan writes the Policy and Medicine blog. He also runs Rockpointe Corporation, a medical education company that works with nonprofits and for-profits to create continuing medical education (CME) programs. As company-sponsored CME and ghostwriting by companies has come under fire, Sullivan has become an outspoken advocate for medical education firms.

Doctors Behaving Badly: Doctor accused of stealing a dying police officer's watch

Seeing Dr. Cleveland Enmon's alleged misdeeds, retold on the nightly news, prompts a double take. A doctor? In a life or death situation? Stole a patient's watch? And the patient was a cop?

Enmon was arraigned last week on grand theft charges in Stockton, Calif., for allegedly swiping a very pricey watch off the wrist of retired Manteca police officer Jerry Kubena.

National pathology firm ignores state licensing laws and is rewarded in state after state

Dr. Patrick Dean has pulled off a magic trick to make Houdini proud.

The founder and president of GI Pathology, a national testing laboratory based in Memphis, Dean has practiced medicine without a license in at least two states. Practicing without a license is often a career killer for a physician. Not so with Dean.

Q&A with Thomas Sullivan: Medical education companies don't deserve media abuse

Thomas Sullivan founded Rockpointe Corporation, a medical education company in 1995. Since then, the company has had success creating continuing medical education materials with funding from big drug company clients and nonprofit groups such as the American Heart Association. On his blog, Sullivan and Dr.

Doctors Behaving Badly: Faith Healer Finally Steps Outside Medical Board's Good Graces

When medical board investigators questioned Dr. Robbi Borjeson about what she had done to treat a patient suffering from a severe case of diabetes, she responded: "I prayed over him."

Borjeson had visited the patient's home in January 2000, where she found him complaining of "fatigue, weight loss, increased thirst, increased urination and sores on his tongue," according to the Arizona Medical Board. She told him take some vitamins.

Doctors with addictions left hanging as diversion program dies

In 2002, when I was covering medicine for The Orange County Register, we produced a series of stories called "Doctors Without Discipline" that uncovered serious flaws in the way the Medical Board of California handled complaints from the public about physicians.

Q&A with Clair Jordan: Defending nurses who blow the whistle

Clair Jordan, the executive director of the Texas Nurses Association for the past 30 years, has seen nurses in a lot of difficult situations.

Doctors Behaving Badly: Cornered doctor turns on nurses, with the help of a friendly sheriff

Nurses have one of the toughest jobs in health care.

Anyone who has delivered a baby in a hospital knows how much work they do, only to see all the credit go to the doctor who comes in for the final few minutes. How many photos have you seen of a nurse holding a brand new baby?



The deadline is approaching to apply for our new all-expenses-paid Fellowship in December 2015, which will introduce 10 California journalists to the wealth of health data sources that can inform and elevate their reporting. The Fellowship includes a $1,000 reporting stipend and six months of mentoring.

Twenty-one journalists from around the country are with us in Los Angeles this week for the 2015 National Health Journalism Fellowship. Read about the Fellowship here. 


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Reporting on Underserved Communities

How can journalists and foundations collaborate to deepen and improve reporting on underserved communities? Our USC Annenberg School of Journalism program in collaboration with The California Endowment, the Wyncote Foundation and Media Impact Funders, convened 75 leaders from both fields.

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